Better to be a Murderer than a so-called “Sex Offender”

In 2007 I signed a plead agreement and went to prison for a sex offense. At the time the law in Missouri said in parole guidelines that I was required to spend 59 month in prison prior to parole, I had no mandatory percentage on sentence, and was told I would be out in 5 to 6 years. I ended up being held to mandatory release date 12 years later, even though I was evaluated by the State as a low risk of another sex offence and was a model inmate.

While in prison I was approached on the prison yard multiple times and told, “You know what your problem is, you let your victims live.  Don’t you know that it is better to be a murder than a sex offender!”  It was pointed out of the two, guess which has to register, have where they live restricted, have where they go restricted, have name listed on internet state sponsored web site, have where they work restricted, made into a social outcast, and lock down on Halloween, and which does not.   When I talked to other former offenders about this, one former offender even told me that his lawyer told him that before he came to prison.  If that does not scare you it should, as it does me.

So the very laws that they claim are to protect people are in fact encouraging people to kill their victims. When laws are created they are usually to encourage one behavior and discourage another, it this case they encourage murder. They should rename the Adam Walsh Child Protection and Safety(Endangerment) Act, because that is what it does, endanger the public. If the message is spreading in the prison yards then you know it is on the streets too.  If they claim the sex crime rates have decreased (which they have not), but what about the total number of missing persons and murders across this country?

BAN Sex Offence Registration and associated laws now, before countless others have to die because of politically correct legislators who are willing to turn registered constituents into second class citizens, perpetuating a false sense of security, while endangering the very people they claim to protect, just to get reelected.

Around  96% of all sex crimes are committed by people NOT on the registry, so who are these registries protecting any way?   All they do is provide a false sense of protection, while not really protecting anyone.

In Spring 1998 UMKC Law Review (1998 Univ. Of Mo-Kc School of law) stated, “Much current legislation, such as registration, notification, and sexual predator laws, are not based on research of criminal statistics or treatment of former sex offenders, what has emerged is a series of hastily-drafted laws in response to public pressure emanating from a string of publicized murders, called sex crimes, such as that which occurred in New Jersey involving the death of Megan Kanka.” That was two decades after the first national sex offence registration law and we have had another two decades since then with no change in how things are done.

Time Magazine, May 21, 2018 “Inside Sex Offender Therapy” by Eliana Dockterman stated: “Punitive measure alone, however, have not been found to meaningfully increase community safety.” “Recent research published by the American Public Health Association suggests that focusing on punishment rather than positive goals can actually increase the chance of recidivism.” “…on national sex-offence recidivism, an overview of studies looking at the numbers in Connecticut, Alaska, Delaware, Iowa & S. Carolina found that the rate is about 3.5% for sex offences.”

Justice Gary Stein (in New Jersey – Artway v. Attorney General of New Jersey) wrote: “humiliation and stigma were not simply parts of early punishment, but at times were the only element of punishment… public notice and public ostracism concerning prior sex offences appear to fall squarely within the parameters of punishment as practiced at the time of the adoption of the Constitution.” Which clearly points out that registration is a punishment no matter what the legislators and courts say. And since it does not really protect anyone as they claim, then it is only punitive in nature not administrative.

In this time of struggles and government short falls it seems a waste to put countless man hours and dollars into registries across this land when it all could be better spent on health care, education, and infrastructure.

Thanks for all the good work.

A. Moore, Concerned American

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